WELCOME TO THE OFFICIAL RICHARD E GERSTEIN JUSTICE BUILDING BLOG. THIS BLOG IS DEDICATED TO JUSTICE BUILDING RUMOR, HUMOR, AND A DISCUSSION ABOUT AND BETWEEN THE JUDGES, LAWYERS AND THE DEDICATED SUPPORT STAFF, CLERKS, COURT REPORTERS, AND CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS WHO LABOR IN THE WORLD OF MIAMI'S CRIMINAL JUSTICE. POST YOUR COMMENTS, OR SEND RUMPOLE A PRIVATE EMAIL AT HOWARDROARK21@GMAIL.COM

Sunday, January 15, 2012

JUDGE JULIO JIMENEZ

Update: Sorry we did not get this up sooner. There will be a memorial service for Judge Jimenez on Wednesday January 18, 2012 at 12:30 PM at Church of the Little Flower,  2711 Indian Mound Trail, Coral Gables, Fl. Mass will be celebrated. 




He was Sy Gaer's law partner, which means he had a connection to the roots of the REGJB. He was a defense attorney, a trial lawyer, a judge, and an all around good guy, and we are sad to report that Julio Jimenez passed away on Sunday. Many of you know he was sick, battling liver cancer. However, Julio Jimenez lived long enough to swear his son in as a member of the Florida Bar this past Friday. There's not much we can add to something as poignant as that. 


He will be missed. 


Here's a fun post we did on a Judge Jimenez battle with the SAO over PTI. 


UPDATE:
Judge Julio Jimenez's Memorial Service will be on Tuesday, January 17, 2012, from 5 pm to 10 pm at Maspons funeral home at 3500 SW 8 Street.


Here is the Herald's obit. 

43 comments:

Anonymous said...

Judge Jimenez was simply a fabulous man. I had the honor of practicing before him as a PD, and we battled eachother, and then grew to respect eachother. In time, I got to know him personally, and he was simply a great man, great judge, and great father. I'll miss him.

Todd Michaels

Real FORMER JUDGE said...

Too many young Judge's dying ...

Manny Crespo, Henry Layte Vidal, Linda Dakis, Ted Klein, Rob Pineiro, Julio Jimenez and more ...

All way too young. May they rest in peace.

Anonymous said...

Is there something wrong with rehab? Why so many people who work there dying so young?

Anonymous said...

We have the privilege of practicing in a unique but great jurisdiction. Judges like Julio Jimenez and the aforementioned judges who left us too soon are a big part of what makes Miami the best place in the country to be a defense attorney or ASA.

Rest in peace... You'll be sorely missed.

Anonymous said...

Why so many cancers in the Justice Building?

CAPTAIN said...

THE CAPTAIN REPORTS:

Judge Julio Jimemez .....

Went to DePaul Law School and graduated in 1977. Passed the Illinois bar that same year. Moved to sunny South Florida and passed the Florida Bar in 1980. Spent 23 years as a criminal defense lawyer.

In 2003, Governor Jeb Bush appointed Judge Jimenez to the bench. He was elected to a full six year term in 2004 unopposed and re-elected without opposition in 2010.

Rest in peace Julio Jimenez. You were a great Judge and you will be missed by us all.

Captain Out .....

Anonymous said...

Manny Crespo, Henry Layte Vidal, and now Julio all of cancer?

Judge Margarita Esquiroz retired due to cancer. When will a bio chemist team be in the various old Court houses taking samples from the air vents and drinking water. How many current Judges have tumors know or unknown?

So sad, and way to common.

Rumpole said...

Looking for your comment? Think real hard why you don't see it.

Anonymous said...

Julio was a great guy. Treated all with respect and courtesy, not just us attorneys but even the most difficult defendant .
Always liked the Man. Will miss a good Judge like him.
DS

Scott Saul said...

When you appeared before him, he was an affable friend and then he addressed you as a judge. Nobody made you feel more welcome in his chambers than Julio. The robe never made him an elitist. I missed him when he left the justice building and will miss him now hat he has left this world.

RIP Julio

Anonymous said...

Rumpole, as a serious discussion, has there ever been test done at REG to determine the carinogen levels?

Anonymous said...

I went up against Judge Jimenez as an ASA, tried a case with him as a defense attorney and appeared before him as a judge. He was passionate about what he did, but always treated everyone he encountered with dignity and respect. I especially liked him when I was a newbie ASA because even though he zealously fought for his clients, he made it a point not to demean or look down on me, and would offer practice pointers. It was obvious his time with Sy Gaer rubbed off on him--and I say that as a compliment.

As a judge, he was outspoken at times but very fair. He treated everyone with respect. Judge Jimenez will be missed--RIP.

Anonymous said...

It's not just the judges. Lots of clerks and support staff have also contracted cancers (and many have died young from them) in the past 20 years. Either there are substances in the building that cause cancer or there is unacceptable levels of electromagnetic radiation from accumulated radon gas or from electronic equipment or who knows from what.

Anonymous said...

Judge Julio Jimenez is an example of what one can accomplish in the years that we are given on this earth. Family man, father, husband, attorney, judge, and a fighter.I know that he fought long enough to see Carlos admitted and has seen his children develop into adults with a great future ahead of them. I have no doubt that Julio's spirit lives in each and every one of them along with his wife. I've had the pleasure of being part of the Jimenez family and Julio has always treated me like a son. I know that I will always keep Julio and his sense of humor close to me. My prayers go out to the Jimenez family. We are all lucky to have known a man like Judge Jimenez.

Adrian Gonzalez

Anonymous said...

It is my understanding that there is another long-time jurist battling cancer (I am not using the name out of respect for their privacy) and I have to wonder if the court houses really are toxic. Wasn't that a theory as to the cause of illness and subsequent death of one of the federal judges in the not so distant past? Someone needs to talk to Joel Brown to get some air quality testing done.

Anonymous said...

Julio:

May the Angels lead you into paradise; may the martyrs greet you at your arrival and lead you into the holy city, Jerusalem.

May the choir of Angels greet you and like Lazarus, who once was a poor man, may you have eternal rest.

Lord, give Julio eternal rest and let perpetual light shine upon him.

Amen.

Rumpole said...

The aircraft I am on has internet access so I will be checking often today and clearing your comments as quick as I can. I will also leave the post up through Tuesday evening.

Barrister of Ballentrae said...

Interesting article in Herald Business section on Women in Law. Good picture of A.G. mentoring a young lawyer ( picture`1 0f 6).

Ballentrae

Anonymous said...

Are you saying that there is a death curse on the Spanish male judges in felony court (Manny Crespo, Roberto Pineiro, Julio Jimenez, Henry Leyte-Vidal)? I think it's the normal death rate, not a curse or the food in the Pickle Barrel.

Rumpole said...

Rob Pinero had a brain anuyerism not related to cancer as near as I kmow. However, I do recall hearing that there was a high level of asbestos at the tine they remodeled the buidling and put in the courtooms on six and seven.

Anonymous said...

Please let us know of the funeral services so all might attend.

We loved you, Judge Jimenez.

Anonymous said...

I first met Julio when he was with Sy Gaer. They were both fun to know and work with.

Julio, you have been pleasure to know. May you rest in peace.

Mike C

Rumpole said...

As soon as I land I will post it. But facdl elail says 5-10 pm tomorrow at 3500 sw 8th st

Rumpole said...

No matter how well intentioned, I won't publish comments about other judges who might be ill so as to respect their privacy.

Anonymous said...

I think these judges and courthouse employees are dying way to young with too many cancers. There are too many cancers and not just the lung cancers related to asbestos.

CAPTAIN said...

THE CAPTAIN REPORTS:

JUDGE JIMENEZ MEMORIAL MASS .....

(In addition to the services on Tuesday):

A Memorial Mass for Judge Jimenez will be held on Wednesday, January 18, 2012, at 12:30 p.m. at Church of the Little Flower, 2711 Indian Mound Trail, Coral Gables, FL,
33134.

CAPTAIN OUT .....

Anonymous said...

do not forget judge Domnick Koo.

Anonymous said...

Best part of that PTI/Judge Jimenez post was that the Judge was ofcourse correct and the guy was later acquitted at trial. Miami SAO acted like the Broward SAO there. Love how they gave the high school athlete PTI for statutory rape (which is quite rare) and yet forced the principal to go to trial. That was Jimenez at his best - able to see the BS in certain situations and courageous enough to say it.

Anonymous said...

rip

Rumpole said...

Once again, if you're looking for your comment disparaging another attorney on a self defense issue, don't hold your breath moron. Wait. Better yet. Do hold your breath.

Can you read? Do you realize that a wonderful and beloved judge has died? Couldn't you wait another day before your cowardly attacks? Well, maybe you couldn't, but we can. So keep holding that breath until we post your slimly little comment.

Anonymous said...

Rump
Dont get upset. Half the comments are by Anonymous ASS-HOLE types sniping from the showdows to afraid to put their name to their comments.
D.S.

Anonymous said...

I do not think it is right to put out the ad seeking a replacement for Julio before he was buried.

Anonymous said...

julio was a great guy and a fair judge. Most importantly he was a great dad which is more important then being a good judge.

DS, It sounds like you are the one who is upset. Does it make you better because you insult people by using your real name?

Last I checked, Rumpole was blogging from the shadows. Some of us simply prefer to be anonymous. It's not because half of us are assholes but rather, we do not constantly need others to know what we are thinking. Which is just a form of being secure as opposed to insecure.

Anonymous said...

Beautiful memorial for Julio today. He will missed! RIP

S. Glick

fotc fobob said...

I follow the "process" of JNC appointments. I regularly question what that committee is doing - much of it seems to make little sense if you compare each of the committee's slate of nominees from one to the next.

Today, they hit a new low. I understand that there may be some statutory requirement that says as soon as the JNC Chair receives a letter from the Governor's Office of an open seat, they must set a schedule and advertise for the open seat.

In the case of Judge Jimenez, they could have waited until the body was buried.

Instead, they issued a Press Release TODAY advertising for the open seat. In fact, I think they handed it out at the 12:30 Mass this afternoon.

FOTC
FOBOB

Anonymous said...

Why in the world did the JNC advertise Judge Jiminez' position on the bench before the poor man was even buried? Very classless!

Anonymous said...

Rumpole, I seriously hope you tackle the issue of the court house perhaps causing people to get cancer.

It's just way to serious to ignore. The other bloggers around town and local media should address the issue head on.

The lives of innocent clerks, court reporters, PD lawyers... could depend on you exposing the truth.

Anyone with data or past reports either in the media or memo's around the court house should email Rumpole so that the lid can be blown off.

Carl Kafka said...

I am proud to have known Julio for over twenty years. He was a generous, genuine, smart man who gave me my start in private practice. The support that the family received in the last two days is a testament to his life. He was proud of Carlos, Katia and Lisa. He will be watching over them as they move on with their lives without his presence.

Julio's wife Lili taught me the definition of unconditional love. She was a rock at his side. For those of us that saw her during the last six months she taught us how to be a better husband, wife and partner.

RIP JEJ

Carl Kafka

Anonymous said...

Julio Jimenez defended me back in 1993 and got me a plea deal that let me continue on with my life and become a productive member of the community. I am forever grateful and may he rest in peace. Myself, family and friends truly owe him our gratitude. I am saddened by his passing and wish that we would have the chance to speak before his death. Thank you Julio for the second chance!

Bob Pardo said...

I had the honor of trying a case with Julio in 1991. At the time it was the first case in Florida charging a defendant with Trafficking in over 150 Kilos. The presiding Judge was Lenny Glick and the State was Reid Rubin and Rae Shern. After lenghthy dliberations the defenadant was found guilty and sentenced to Life without parole.
Fast forward 17 years..Judge Julio Jimenez asks me a favor..to do a request for Commutation of Sentence From the Governor..the sentence was just not fair..
He called the warden of the prison and soon we were speaking to Daniel Sanchez our client. Unbeknowst to us Danny had started the petition..he said he was in the chappel and something had told him to wait..that someone would call him. Three days later, I recieved his clemency package in the mail.
Judge Glick and Reid Ruben both wrote letters supporting a commutation of sentence to CTS.
I was able to argue for a Commutation in the Capitol Building in front of the Governor and the Cabinet and my petition was granted on the spot.
Julio believed in what was just and fair. I will always remember him. He was a great mentor and friend. He gave me my start in private practice.

Thank you Julio..you will be remembered and you will be missed.
RIP
Bob Pardo

Anonymous said...

Hey Bob.......how about commending Lenny Glick and Reid Rubin for writing letters as well. Not many judges or prosecutors would do that, especially on that kind of charge. Then again, Lenny and Reid were always stand-up guys so I'm not at all surprised that they'd to what they did.

BTDT

Rumpole said...

Yes I completely agree. When prosecutors stand up and do what is right they need to recognized for their professionalism. As to Judge Glick, his agreement to write a letter on behalf of the defendant he sentenced to life without parole not only speaks well of Judge Glick, but highlights the awful problem of minimum mandatories and sentences that are not subject to any review. How many more people are in prison who have reformed and who would benefit from a review of their case twenty years later?

Anonymous said...

Julio was a kind and honest gentleman. I tried my very first case with him in federal court as a defense counsel. He encouraged me then as a young lawyer. Therafter, I became a prosecutor where we were involved in the Harbor case, one of the largest drug prosecutions in SDFL -- 28 defendants & 5 tons of cocaine. He was a pleasure to have on either side -- the voice of reason and gentility. He was always so professional with a great sense of humor. You could always trust him because his word was his bond. A humble man who never lost his common touch even after he became a judge. My most profound sympathies to his family and his dear friend Karl. He will be missed.