WELCOME TO THE OFFICIAL RICHARD E GERSTEIN JUSTICE BUILDING BLOG. THIS BLOG IS DEDICATED TO JUSTICE BUILDING RUMOR, HUMOR, AND A DISCUSSION ABOUT AND BETWEEN THE JUDGES, LAWYERS AND THE DEDICATED SUPPORT STAFF, CLERKS, COURT REPORTERS, AND CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS WHO LABOR IN THE WORLD OF MIAMI'S CRIMINAL JUSTICE. POST YOUR COMMENTS, OR SEND RUMPOLE A PRIVATE EMAIL AT HOWARDROARK21@GMAIL.COM

Saturday, April 14, 2012

THE FRENCH ARE BETTER PARENTS

This NY Time article contends the French are better parents in one important way- the way they teach their children to eat. 


(Yes, Angry Girl, this is for you.)


From the article: 
Our children are three times more likely to be overweight than French children...we lead the world in producing overweight children, but the French have one of the lowest rates of overweight children in the developed world...


The reason lies in how we teach our kids to eat...French parents teach their children to eat like we teach our kids to read: with love, patience and firm persistence they expose their children to a wide variety of tastes, flavors and textures that are the building blocks of a varied, healthy diet. Pediatrician-recommended first foods for French babies are leek soup, endive, spinach and beets (not bland rice cereal — have you ever tasted that stuff)? They teach their children that “good for you foods” taste good (broccoli – yum!), whereas we often do the opposite.
The result is a nation of healthy eaters: 6 million French children sit down every day to school lunches featuring dishes like cauliflower casserole, baked endive, beet salad and broccoli. Vending machines and fast food are banned, and flavored milk is not an option. To introduce kids to a wide variety of foods, no dish can be repeated more than once per month. ...
French children are also trained to think about how to eat. The French won’t ask a child, for example, “Are you full,” but rather “Are you still hungry” — a very different feeling. 
Just in case you were wondering, diets for French children are relatively rare; few of them need it. Nor are they deprived of treats: “food is fun” is the Golden Rule of French eating. 
Moderation, not deprivation — along with viewing food as a source of pleasure, a fun family adventure — is the core of French food culture. 
Rumpole says: What is one of the major problems bedeviling our society? Health care costs. What is the simplest way to control those costs? Stay healthy. What is the number one cause of poor health?Poor eating habits. 
Food for thought: a votre dante' !

41 comments:

"American Minority" said...

Rump my friend you must be board I've just checked in to see today's topic as I have not been to sleep since yesterday.I'm during research on a particular issue. Anyhow kids don't get out and play enough like they did in my day me played Nintendo, and Sega games, but we played more outside.

I used to ride the down ramp on the turnpike near "Joe Robbie" Stadium before it was finished. Lots of fun stayed skinny,and played sports.

Anonymous said...

Rumpole,

as a person who has struggled with their weight and gone up and down, I can tell you that the one thing that makes it difficult for Americans is the cost of produce. Produce is simply the most expensive products in the supermarket. It wasn't until I went into private practice and had a significant jump in income where I could regularly shop at Whole Foods and Fresh Market and afford the produce and organic meats to feed my family with. We are a family are 4 and spend well over $1200 a month on groceries (almost all of which is produce and organic meats). My kids eat berries regularly (we all know how expensive raspberries can be), fresh vegetables year round regardless of season and tons of wild fish. When I was a kid, there is no way my parents could have fed me that stuff.

Anonymous said...

Your all idiots, its because they teach them to smoke at a young age. Because of this they have diminished olfactory and gustatory senses and a suppressed appetite. Please confirm your research before you post such ridiculous things.

Anonymous said...

what the hell does the french child menu have to do with justice building, law, legal profession? is this post by rumpole or captain's l2 year old?

Anonymous said...

The French also eat a lot of Brie, cream sauces, and bread. However, they walk everywhere, do not snack in between meals, and have portion control.

I think our portions as Americans are sinful. Super sized this or that, 64 oz sugary sodas.

My generation ate fast food and cookies and junk but we played outside, rode our bikes, and are normal amounts of food. The supersize gimmick didn't begin until the mid 90s.

Anonymous said...

9:24, produce is going to get even more expensive will all the anti-immigrant hysteria and deport-them-all legislation sweeping this country. Native Americans just don't want to work the vegetable fields and don't have the skills and stamina to do so.

Rumpole said...

6:28 am. As stupid as we are, somehow we learned the difference between "your" and "you're" and as smart as you are you did not.

Anonymous said...

rumpole. voulez vous couchez avec moi, ce soir? je m'excuse mais je ne comprends pas. es que vous aime le broccoli? qui, j'aime le broccoli. Mon capitain, es que vous le premier ou es n'est pas extraordinaire?

Anonymous said...

On the 10:39:00 a.m. comment, "Native Americans" means "Native-born Americans", that is, Americans born in the United States.

Anonymous said...

10:29:00 a.m., maybe Rumpole or the Captain have secret crush on Angry Gurl. They are in for a big surprise if Angry Gurl turns out to be an angry guy.

CAPTAIN said...

Every time I visit France I notice the amazing differences between our society and theirs when it comes to this topic. When I ride the mass transit system, the Metro, and all about you it is difficult to find one single person that is overweight. Eating dinner at the restaurants, the portion control is evident; no one has a dish with a heaping of food on it. And the dishes are all healthy, with lots of veggies.

Like another wrote, they walk a lot too.

Oh yeah, did I mention how naturally beautiful the French women are. They use very little or no makeup and all of them are gorgeous.

Paris is always on my list of favorite places to visit.

Anonymous said...

yea, I love the hairy armpits on the french girls and their BO really turns me on when I visit France.

Anonymous said...

@12:05- LMFAO!!

Anonymous said...

If you are suggesting we emulate the French with regard to their eating style, that's fine. But that is where is ends for me.

The French people disgust me. I just can't forgive or forget their complicity with the Third Reich in WWII nor De Gaul opposing and undermining the D Day invasion.

Anonymous said...

Why does Rumpole insist on putting this country down or comparing it to others? Sure we got problems but I wouldn't wanna live anyplace else.

About that article--- Paris is notorious for smoke filled cafes. Ummm, yea, real healthy.

In conclusion--- God Bless America.

Anonymous said...

Nice move Robin Faber.
First put $100000 into your campaign as a cash ontribution so the untrained viewer thinks you raised $158K, then 2 das later switch it to a loan. SO in reality you're really only raised $58,000.

Anonymous said...

YES! YES! YES!

Eye on Coppel said...

But Judge Faber fixed his mistake. Robert Coppel put 50k as a contribution and hasn't changed it to a loan. It is unlawful to contribute more than $500 to your campaign, Robert! Notice how every other candidate only donates $500 to their own campaign? Every other dolalr has to be a loan. Robert is going to be disqualified if he wins the election.

Anonymous said...

$58,000 HAPPENS TO BE AMAZING. I guess that must mean he is doing a great job and his supporters certainly agree with him. Nobody is fooled and thinks he did that with his loan intentionally. It was obviously an error. OOOH, 5:21 another wanna be, I guess just looking for something to complain about.

Anonymous said...

qualification week coming up and you are posting about the French??? Come on Rumpole--this blog is turning into sh*t......

Anonymous said...

6:28- you are indeed an idiot!

P.S. notice that "you are" in the above statement could have been spelled as "you're" . Get your grammar right! Even a 12 year old French kid knows the difference between your and you're- maybe it's all the cigarettes they let him smoke!

Idiot!

Anonymous said...

Martinez is going to be PD again with out any opponents

Anonymous said...

7:57pm, you are an idiot or someone connected to Verde's campaign which is further proof you are an idiot. There is nothing illegal in what Robert did in loaning his campaign $50K or how it is reported. And the thought that you would mentioned Faber in the same sentence as Robert makes me sick. Robert is an intelligent, hardworking, fair and decent man. Faber, at least, is hardworking.

Bubba Bob said...

Why does Rumpole insist on putting this country down or comparing it to others?

Simply because we are racist, fascist assholes.

Anonymous said...

7:47, campaign finance violations are not grounds for disqualification. They may subject the candidate to sanctions from the Florida Elections Commissions or the Judicial Qualifications Commission (which can remove the judge for judicial ethics rule violations and I doubt that they will consider a simple reporting mistake to even be a violation) but do not disqualify the candidate from running or holding office.

mikal said...

Today is a beautiful day. Take your kids to Grapeland Water Park, near MIA. Yesterday it was almost empty but it should be a bit more crowded today.

It is a great place for the kids to run around and tire themselves out. It isn't a great place for fine dining,though.

Anonymous said...

Ana Pando admitted writing the letter but, disputed everything else. Catalano her lawyer? I thought Josefsberg was representing her?

Eye on Coppel said...

9;27am:

You are missing the POINT. Coppel did not LOAN his campaign 50k. He contributed 50k to his campaign. Max contribution is $500. He broke the law. Period. End of discussion. Verde wins!

Anonymous said...

Who is going to file against Patty Marino Pedraza? Shirlyon Mcwhorter should come back for a rematch on this one!!!

Anonymous said...

12:20 a.m., you keep missing the point! Even if Coppel did contribute $50,000 to his campaign, that's not related to qualifications, it would be a campaign finance violation that would not prevent him from taking office. If Verde were to complain to the FEC, he would get a fine if they find a violation. If she complains to the JQC he could get anything from a reprimand to removal, if the JQC were to find a violation of the canons of judicial ethics. Either way, Verde would not win, because if Coppel gets removed, the governor would make the appointment to his seat.

Anonymous said...

Ha, I love France and French food!

Anonymous said...

Rumpole:

I don't think that your beloved Knicks want to play the Heat in the playoffs. When is the last time that the Knicks beat the Heat anyway?

Anonymous said...

Mr. 9:27 am.

Wrong. Campaign violations do not alter the outcome but, could end up costing the candidate big bucks.

By the way, a candidate himself can loan or give all the money in the world to his own campaign.

Mitt Romney could be a judge by writing a check.... well if he had a law degree and half a brain.

DS sez: said...

I dont get the Coppel bashing. It is a non issue if you loan or give your own campaign, your own money. Your $ Your Campaign is no sin. . Its the taking from relatives, saying its your $ and such as cover thats punishable.
I have know Robert for over 20 years, We were partners in Arthur Rothenberg..
He he is well versed in the law, has been a division attorney, is even tempered and runs a great training program for the office.

If he acted on the Bench like he does` everyday at work, He would be an excellaqnt Judge.

DS

Anonymous said...

Verde henchmen posting all over the place. Wow. Isn't it amazing her broke clients always have enough to pay her $10K.... And never flip on the owner of the grow house they get busted in??

Anonymous said...

DS is right Coppel is a class act.

Anonymous said...

we are around this daily so we forget how difficult it is for a person the first time they get arrested. See how this student reacts to this event in their life http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/04/16/2751554/police-uf-student-apparently-jumped.html

Anonymous said...

ugliest story i have read about democracy gone amuck in a long time http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/state/warnings-lead-circuit-judge-krista-marx-to-abandon-2306123.html?formName=marc+cooper&formEmail=marccooper5%40gmail.com&formBody=I+just+lost+a+bit+of+respect+for+aronberg&formPostingFilterErrCode=104

Anonymous said...

Judicial Candidate said:

There is a term, in Miami-Dade County, for the shenanigans described in the story about Palm Beach County linked at 6:56. That term is "business as usual."

Until you have run, and run against the self-appointed powers that be, you have no idea what nasty, destructive activity goes on every single judicial election -- extortion, vote-buying, intimidation, smear campaigns, race-baiting, ethnic slander. The effect on the system is plenary. The toll on candidates' families -- who are favored targets -- is devastating. You may be tough enough to carry the weight -- but it begins to wear when you come home from another forum to find your spouse has gotten "one of those calls."

This stuff works because voter interest is so low, and the turnout is so carefully controlled and managed, that it doesn't ultimately take many votes to sway a judicial election here. (One thing that would improve the situation would be to move the elections out of August and into the November ballot where turnout is much alrger.) Add in the absentee ballot machines and that's the ballgame. The system is corrupt from the bottom to the top -- and if you are not willing to pay to play, you are simply doomed.

Those who run the program have no sense that what they are up to is wrong -- and in some cases criminal. If challenged, they will actually justify it to your face: "You don't have any right to run in this election in the first place, so it’s your fault if you don’t like what’s happening" was one unashamed comment made to me. (Hard to argue, I suppose, that running is voluntary, so in a sense one subjects oneself to the full treatment. But what was interesting was the idea that I “didn’t have the right” to run. I also heard, “who do you think you are, running against XXXX. The right thing for you to do is drop out or switch races.” This was an OPEN seat mind you; not a challenge to some beloved incumbent. And – not for nothing – I’d filed quite a long time before XXXX had. But the salient point is that when candidates and their paid handlers/minions come to the election with that sense of class/racial/ethnic entitlement, they have no trouble, evidently, justifying any extreme of behavior.)

But judicial candidates run scared and so, when they can afford to, they hire EVERYONE, paying $15,000 or more for consulting "services." (Of course, the main service provided is that of not finding some empty suit to run in opposition. This is not implicit or subtle – it is explicit. It would take a law degree from a better school than the one I attended to distinguish this behavior from extortion.) What services are provided are almost always in violation of the CJC or the law: Joint campaigning activities for multiple judicial candidates, partisan (republican or democratic) appeals for fundraising, quid-pro-quo with legislators, promises regarding various positions to be taken on the bench, buying access to media (not paying for advertising -- which is of course legal -- but kicking back for airtime and access outside of advertising), vote trading, intimidation of other candidates and supporters, destruction of campaign signage (there are fellows whose only job this is), vote manipulation (especially at los comedores), AB collection, etc. Only a very few of the more tangential "consultants" provide real services, such as helping to schedule events, making introductions to community leaders, distributing campaign materials, and recruiting/organizing poll workers.

I'm not sure how much the public knows or cares about what goes on, so perhaps they are able to sustain the illusion of a lofty judiciary. But as a lawyer, if this doesn't substantially diminish your respect for the judges before whom you practice, then you're just not paying attention.

Anonymous said...

I agree with 6:26 pm. If you doubt what he/she says, ask Rosa Rodriguez. It may cost you some fines and a suspension, but the JQC and the Supreme Court have no backbone on this issue and refuse to do the right thing. If they did not remove her, they will not remove anyone.

I Decide Who Becomes a Judge said...

Dear Rump, you should post Judicial Candidates (cough cough Robert Cuntz cough cough) rant on the front page of your website. Sour grapes should be shared.

As to you Mr. Judicial Candidate without the cojones to post your name, I'd note that the true sense of entitlement comes from someone who was a lawyer for a millisecond with only 1 trial under his belt thinking he was ready for the big boy league.