WELCOME TO THE OFFICIAL RICHARD E GERSTEIN JUSTICE BUILDING BLOG. THIS BLOG IS DEDICATED TO JUSTICE BUILDING RUMOR, HUMOR, AND A DISCUSSION ABOUT AND BETWEEN THE JUDGES, LAWYERS AND THE DEDICATED SUPPORT STAFF, CLERKS, COURT REPORTERS, AND CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS WHO LABOR IN THE WORLD OF MIAMI'S CRIMINAL JUSTICE. POST YOUR COMMENTS, OR SEND RUMPOLE A PRIVATE EMAIL AT HOWARDROARK21@GMAIL.COM

Saturday, May 12, 2007

MEMORIES OF KEN FELDMAN

Wonderful tributes and memories of our friend and colleague:


Judy & Dave Tobin said...
Kenny was one of the finest attorneys in Miami, but more importantly was one of the nicest human beings we've known. He has always taken care of other people's problems. And for those of you who do not know, several years ago Ken donated his bone marrow to his dying brother. We will miss him greatly. Rest in peace my dear friend. Judy & Dave Tobin


JONATHAN COLBY said...
In my 6 years that I spent over at the Justice Building, I met so many interesting and accomplished attorneys. Each had their own unique personality. Ken Feldman stood out somehow. He always came into the courtroom with a big smile, was thoroughly prepared and his clients seemed to love him - no matter what their punishment was going to be -they always thanked him and knew that he did his best to defend them. Ken was the first person to line up to assist in everyone's re-election campaign. He never had to be asked. I remember how hard he worked for all...from Kathy Fernandez Rundle to all of his friends who were looking for a JNC appointment. He was always kind to everyone. I never heard anyone say a bad thing about him. I remember that he loved to teach and he gave so much of himself to train young lawyers and students. He genuinely had a passion to pass on what he had learned, introduce these young lawyers to the judges that they would appear in front of and explain the importance of ethics to them. "Kindness" is what he always gave. After all, as the lyrics to that great song say: "in the end, only kindness matters". It is very sad that he must have felt so alone before he died. It is so sad that he would feel compelled to take his own life. What it must be like to feel that one does not have anything to look forward to or that they could not overcome the emotional demons within their soul. Rest in peace Ken. With your profound and unselfish kindness to others, you made an impact on so many others during your life. That is what we all should strive for. You have taught us all to be more kind to others Ken. Thank you. Jonathan Colby


Anonymous said...
Ken was a great man with tremendous enthusiasm for the things he cared about, including his students. I'll miss him.



Ken Feldman was a gentleman and fine attorney.Unfortunately,these word are often not mentioned during a persons lifetime,but after their demise.St.Thomas Law School students will miss him,as will the criminal justice system in Miam Dade County.

Judge Shell Schwartz


Anonymous said...
Mr. Feldman was a spectacular man and excellant professor. He gave so much and touched many lives. He was one person at our university and another when you spoke to him on a personal level. Driven, dedicated, and lonely. Despite his own turmoil During difficult times in my own life he stepped up. He never allowed me to give into hopelessness. This from a man I barely knew . He was always there to hand me a tissue and to tell me to toughen up or I would never make in the legal profession. Over time Mr. Feldman and I became friends and our time together discovered a man who was not only lonely, but in a tough place in his own life. As he once told me "We all have issues its how we cope and make change". Ken always made the students feel as if they had someone in their corner in a COLD COLD place. I will miss Ken and Professor Feldman and our pep talks. I will continue praying for his soul.


Anonymous said...
Mr. Feldman was a spectacular man and excellant professor. He gave so much and touched many lives. He was one person at our university and another when you spoke to him on a personal level. Driven, dedicated, and lonely. Despite his own turmoil During difficult times in my own life he stepped up. He never allowed me to give into hopelessness. This from a man I barely knew . He was always there to hand me a tissue and to tell me to toughen up or I would never make in the legal profession. Over time Mr. Feldman and I became friends and our time together discovered a man who was not only lonely, but in a tough place in his own life. As he once told me "We all have issues its how we cope and make change". Ken always made the students feel as if they had someone in their corner in a COLD COLD place. I will miss Ken and Professor Feldman and our pep talks. I will continue praying for his soul.


Theodore G. Mastos said...
We have all lost a dear friend and colleague in Ken Feldman. He truly cared about his clients, his students, and the system we all work to uphold. I always knew that any campaign would include Ken without his being asked to participate. He was always there in his quiet yet comforting way.

Rest in peace, Ken.

Theodore G. Mastos


Anonymous said...
Ken Feldman will be missed. He was an excellent attorney, a great teacher, and an even better human being. He was ALWAYS willing to help, guide, and lead. He graciously donated his time and energy to good causes, and never thought twice about helping a young attorney further their career. It is with great sadness that we mourn his passing. He will always be thought of fondly, and his smile, as well as uplifting personality, will be missed in the rather gloomy justice building.

Rest in peace Ken...you are in our prayers!!


Anonymous said...

Judge Jonathan Colby's tribute to Ken Feldman says it all. Bravo for the way that you have stated Ken's fine attributes and how important kindness is. WE AS A COMMUNITY AT THE REGJB should take to heart this message and Judge's should treat attorneys, defendants and victims with kindness - - - asa's and defense attorneys should treat each other with kindness --- and we should all take this lesson out into public and treat all of those who we encounter with "kindness". That would be a fitting tribute to Ken Feldman. "

In the end, only kindness matters" - That is a stunning and true comment.

Rumpole says: wonderful words and thoughts and it reminds us that at a basic level, we in this community are friends and some are close enough to be considered family. We laugh together, love together, and sometimes we weep and mourn together.

28 comments:

Anonymous said...

RUMP YOU CENSORED MY COMMENT ON DR. MOSMAN WHY?

Anonymous said...

Ken embodied everything that is good about our profession. He was an incredible advocate for his clients who at all times acted like a true professional. He gave back to the profession by helping to train new young lawyers. But more than that, Ken Feldman was a wonderful person. I shall miss him. Rest on Peace my friend.

David Young

Rumpole said...

Because a day after the man killed himself is not the time- on my blog- to trash him. Do that on your own blog. His death was also a tragedy and I would suggest you meditate for 24 hours on the problems and anger you have that lead you to trash a man within a day of his death. And on a petty issue to boot.

Anonymous said...

10:24 p.m., I have some advice for you that may help you in your deep anger over not getting to publicize a nasty comment on a guy who recently put a bullet in his head.

Today is mother's day. I don't know if you're mother is alive, but if she is and you call or see her today (I wouldn't be surprised if you actually live with her), discuss this with her. Say "mommy, last night I tried to put on the internet a nasty comment about a guy who killed himself and the guy in charge of the website wouldn't let me."

Then tomorrow, on your way to the Gerstein building, put on one of those sandwich boards that say "I AM A DISGUSTING PIECE OF CRAP."

Jonathan Blecher said...

Kenny Feldman will be missed.

One thing I always will remember about him was the ever-present smile on his face and he never passed me in the building without a hello.

Anonymous said...

Mosman caused my family grief like you just do not know.

Anonymous said...

Re police intentionally charging defendants piecemeal in order to screw up their bond status; it actually is WORSE than that. How about charging the defendant, waiting until he takes a state prison plea, and THEN filing additional charges under a new case (based on same criminal episode) which could and should have been charged originally, and then insisting on a much lengthier prison sentence (because they didn't like the original plea). This actually happened a couple of weeks ago. Thank god Judge Rodriguez was covering the calendar that day> She called the state and the cops on it, and didn't let them get away with it!

uungaro said...

To say that Ken Feldman was generous with his time, heart and mind is mere understatement. His commitment and enthusiam for Lawyers For Literacy was an inspiration to the St. Thomas teaching fellows and all of the rest of us involved with the project. When he taught for the project at the homeless assistance center, there was always a sense of excitement in the room-- his smile, his sense of humor and his energy were infectious. I so regret that, although I probably knew Ken as a professional for more than two decades, we only worked closely together for the for the last couple of years and, in that timt, had only scratched the surface of our friendship.But I so would have liked to get to know him better. Whatever brought him to his decision, I hope that he now is resting peacefully--and somehow knows that he is fondly remembered and will be greatly missed. Ursula Ungaro

Anonymous said...

Ken Feldman was a "Class Act".

He did not know the meaning of the word NO.
As a mentor and teacher to young professionals he always had time to help and counsel. His unbounding energy and enthusiasm about teaching the law and how to be a "professional" was a sight I had the privilage to behold.
In Court he was one of the best, setting an example for all of us.
He was a good personal friend to my wife, Dianne, and I. There is no way we could begin to repay him for his many kindnesses through out the years. He was so enouraging to my daughter Stacy and my son-in-law, Oded Chayoun in their efforts to go to St. Thomas Law School.
I hope their successes have justified his confidence.
Ken was a tireless worker for worthy causes in the community in addition to his work at his beloved St. Thomas Law School. His work for the WELLNESS CENTER will always be remembered.
Whatever the reasons that bring us here today and cause us, his friends and colleagues, to be so sad, let us hope they will never overshadow his contributions to our community, our profession to us personally.
We all like to think we are making a difference in this world. With Ken we don't have to guess...we actually know.
Cherish all of your friendships, they are one of the few intangibles we can take from this life.

Lenny and Dianne Glick
Stacy Glick
Adrianne and Oded Chayoun

Anonymous said...

Where are the DUI power rankings???

Rumpole said...

to 12:32- Dr. Mosmon may have caused your family grief. To you he may have been a "bad man." I have never met him. I do not know him. A lawyer (presumably) posted he killed himself a few days ago. Now, he enters that timeless space we all must some day go to. I have no idea if he lived a good life or a bad life. But I suggest you let him go in peace. And if you cannot do so, find some other outlet to curse him to enternity. Your anger is not mine, and I do not have to take part in your desire to defame his memory. You may be 100% justified in feeling the way you do, but this blog is not about that-get it?

Anonymous said...

I cannot start my Sunday until those DUI power rankings go up. Puleeezee get them up rump.

Anonymous said...

HERE THEY COME......DUI POWER RANKINGS (C) ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
THE DUI GUY.

1. Bobby Reiff 1.00
2. Lurvey & Lyons .998
3. Carlos Canet .990
4. Jonathan Blecher .983
5. The Dade PD's .980
6. Richard Hersch .894
7. Michael Catalano .876
8. Rob Biswas .865
9. Mike Braxton .850
10. Phil Reizenstein .799

JIMBO BEST FALLS FROM THE TOP TEN. The aging champ could not hang on.

Anonymous said...

Rumpole, please pass this message on: To the members of the Federal PDs office: attention: You are bright, dedicated, hard working and talented attorneys. Stress the word: ATTORNEY. LAWYER. WHATHAVE YOU. YOU CANNOT SING OR DANCE WORTH A LICK.

DO NOT. REPEAT. DO NOT GIVE UP YOUR DAY JOBS, but I did laugh at the show, and thanks for your efforts.

Anonymous said...

4:50, thanks for letting all of us know this is your first trip to the FPD seminar. That group of lawyers that do the ending music show do not pretend to be musically talented. They spend all weekend while you are drinking the free booze FACDL-Miami gave you and put that show together.

Thanks for your worthwhile contribution to the defense community kiddo. Keep writing.

Anonymous said...

5:28- thanks for being a no-nonsense no sense of humor stick in the mud. I was obviously thanking them for their efforts. Except Richard Moore.
But Kiko as Alberto Gonzales was great.
(just kidding richard- thanks for making me laugh.)

Anonymous said...

This morning I posted a question about GORTS, HVO's. Was the question somehow inappropriate, or did I forget to hit send?

Anonymous said...

Rumpole regards Dr. Mosman:

I would agree with you on all your points, except that because of Dr. Mosman/Atty Mosman, a little girl was molested by her father.

Had he been ethical like the other doctor who examined the girls father and found him to be a danger to the 3yr old girl (as the other doctor did), I might have compassion for his death.

He was a hired gun for many. The money bought his results so I don't and maybe I have a right not to have compassion for him.

Anonymous said...

Thanks, DUI guy!

Rumpole said...

6:00 PM. Obviously this is a personal issue to you, and molestation of a child is a tragedy. Again, I do not know the details. But you use the term "hired gun." I will tell you that if I was asked to defend a child rapist, I would do so. Not because I approve of it. I do not. But in my profession I cannot draw a line between crimes I approve of and crimes I do not. I would do my very best, and if the client was guilty and the police did their job well, then hopefully justice would be done. But make no mistake about this- if the police did not do their job well, I would have no hesitation in doing my job, regardless of the outcome. That is the system we have choosen, and it breaks down and innocent people go to jail when I or any defense attorney starts making moral judgments about a the conduct of which my client has been accused.

Anonymous said...

He was supposed to be a nuetral psychologist (he was not acting as the fathers attorney).

The key word I use Rumpole is nuetral instead he choose the cash over the welfare of a child.

Anonymous said...

I am interested in your last comment Rumpole; that, we, as Defenders cannot make moral judgements of our clients and take that into consideration. While I think you represent the majority view, I offer this dissent:

Only in the rarest of cases do I not consider the karmic consequences for both the client and myself and act accordingly. It may come in the approach to the witnesses; or in plea negotiations; or how I conduct cross or arguments. And whether they are guilty or not, particularly on a sex case, I would argue, is important, if not crucial in devising and measuring one's defense.

Anonymous said...

Kenny Feldman was the kind of lawyer many could learn from. Money was not his God. Justice and an opportunity to be represented ruled his professional life. He did more pro bono than anyone will ever know. How sad that no one who cared for him and admired him could could ease his pain. It makes me hope there is a better place and that Ken is there. Della Street

Dianne Glick said...

Did this ever happen to you? You know you needed to email Ken about something. You make a mental note of it. You turn your computer on and lo and behold you have an email from Ken. He has already taken care of the favor you were going to ask him about. That was what Ken Feldman was all about. Everything seemed so easy to him. Everything he did for everyone was done with such delight. He lit up the room when he entered. His smile and warmth was contagious. Nothing was a chore. His good deeds slid of his back as if they waiting just for you. He never ceased to amaze me. Like a magician. He could pull a drop of human kindness out of a silk hat just when it was needed. And that was Ken. Dianne Glick

Rumpole said...

What a wonderful thing to say about Ken. And so true.

Anonymous said...

Sorry, 6:00, Dr. Mosman is not responsible for the molestation, the molester is responsible. Why no misplaced anger directed at the judge who couldn't see through the hired gun's "opinion?" Why no misplaced anger at the lawyer who asked for release? The actors who operate in the criminal justice system, i.e., judges who grant release and the advocates who ask for it, are no more responsible for a defendant's actions than the licensing authorities who grant driving privileges to people who cause accidents or the manufacturers that build fast cars or guns that kill people.

Anonymous said...

11:45 am DR. Mosmans hired gun report was the fathers lawyer making a record for appeal and thats ashame.

You can bet I tried with every once of energy to stop the injustice that was about to happen to this little girl but I was not a PH.D doctor making a report that the father was a great rehabilated guy.

One PH.D say he was a danger and here comes Dr. Mosman who paved the way for harm to the Child. This is not a isolated incident I know of dozens.

Anonymous said...

You don't know anything about Dr Mosman or his character. He was a kind caring man who went out of his way to help those in need.