WELCOME TO THE OFFICIAL RICHARD E GERSTEIN JUSTICE BUILDING BLOG. THIS BLOG IS DEDICATED TO JUSTICE BUILDING RUMOR, HUMOR, AND A DISCUSSION ABOUT AND BETWEEN THE JUDGES, LAWYERS AND THE DEDICATED SUPPORT STAFF, CLERKS, COURT REPORTERS, AND CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS WHO LABOR IN THE WORLD OF MIAMI'S CRIMINAL JUSTICE. THIS BLOG HAS BEEN CALLED "THE DEFINITIVE BLOG ON MIAMI CRIMINAL LAW" BY THE NY TIMES, THE WASHINGTON POST, THE POPE, AND DONALD TRUMP WHO ALSO ONCE SAID IT WAS "REALLY GREAT". POST YOUR COMMENTS, OR SEND RUMPOLE A PRIVATE EMAIL AT HOWARDROARK21@GMAIL.COM

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Lot 26 Woes

"Ebony and Ivory live together in perfect harmony."

So goes the song. 

Not so much for criminal defense attorneys and law enforcement officers. 

Lot 26, the parking lot adjacent ("next to" for our robed readers) to the REGJB, has become a flash point of sorts once again. This is the parking lot young ASAs tramp through every day, lugging carts teeming with disorderly conduct and DWLS cases while sipping Starbucks and snapchatting and walking right down the middle of the lot oblivious to the line of cars creeping  behind them looking for a parking space. 

But more of the issue is police officers who are not good neighbors, parking lot wise. Which reminds us, as Donald Trump is wont to say, tall fences make good neighbors. 


However, the problem  with sharing (a skill covered in kindergarten) is percolating just beneath the surface:

Evidence this rant, which went the  FACDL listserv equivalent of viral:

Good morning,
Several years ago those of us who pay upwards of $100 a month to park in lot 26 were asked to share the parking lot with law enforcement officers who get to park there for free.
Throughout the years there's been conflict especially on Monday mornings when the parking lot tends to be over full.
Below please find photographs of a particular law enforcement officer who chose to park in a manner taking up two parking spaces on a Monday morning.
If we are all required to share we should all be courteous to those around us, especially if you were invited to park in our lot for free.
If someone knows who this officer is please advise he or she that they would benefit from retaking the parking class at the police academy. Thank you

Here is defense exhibit one, which to be honest with you, is more like the work of a City of Miami Crime Scene tech, then a good and clear picture of the problem. 





7 comments:

Jordan said...

Wow. I'm sure handling a case like this can be aggravating! It'd be nice if law enforcement could work in a way that works better with the people and the courts they're working with daily, but I guess getting some sweet parking spaces was a higher priority that day.

Anonymous said...

Any one of us could make far more money than we do as lawyers if we bought the lot and built a garage on it.

CAPTAIN JUSTICE said...


THE CAPTAIN REPORTS:

GROUP 35 - COUNTY

Challenger to Incumbent Wendell Graham, candidate Antonio G. Jimenez informed me today that he has paid his filing fee to run in this group and that he IS NOT MOVING (my caps - not his).

The race is on !!!

CAP OUT .....
Captain4Justice@gmail.com

Anonymous said...

Berdie Soto used to work on the parking lot issue daily.

Now, those lazy cops block sidewalks, driveways and park like pigs simply because police managers don't care. Laws do not apply to police.

The Professor said...

Sounds like Mr. Jimenez is betting on Wendell dropping and retiring to preserve his ability to sit as a senior judge. Good bet.

Anonymous said...

Rumpole - Take a look at the Third DCA's 'opinions' today in criminal cases. Then look at the criminal appeals that were PCA'd. And no, it is not the case that these PCAs issued in meritless cases. Anyone who says that does not practice criminal appellate law in this district. In every week of every year for many years now, the Third DCA is the laziest most prosecution-oriented district in the state. This is a long-running scandal that no one reports about.

Anonymous said...

6. Why doesn't Rumpole understand that inefficiency causes cases to plead, which allows for judges to clear their docket from 651 cases to 637 only to get back to 668 next week? Remember, the goal is not justice, it's a lower caseload. If the system made it easier, no one would get frustrated and just want to close their cases.